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> ARAGO, EULOGY ON AMPÈRE., 1872.
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the question of the universal language with the same comprehensiveness and the same research as 
Descartes and Leibnitz, but it can be  said at least, that he did not banish its solution, as the 
first of these philosophers did to the land of romance. Nor did he confine himself as the second 
did, to dissertations on the marvelous fitness of the future instrument. This instrument he created! 
Several of Ampère’s friends have had in their hands a grammar and dictionary, the fruits of his 
indefatigable perseverance, containing the almost finished rules of the new language. Some have 
heard him recite fragments of a poem composed in this new tongue, and can testify to its harmony, 
the only thing, to tell the truth, of which they could judge, as the meaning of the words was 
unintelligible to them. Who, besides, among us does not remember the joy experienced by our 
associate, when, in glancing over the work of a modern traveler, he discovered in the vocabulary of 
a certain African tribe several combinations, which he had himself formed. It will be remembered 
that a similar discovery was the chief cause of Ampère’s warm admiration for the Sanskrit. 
A work which has reached such a degree of advancement, should not be condemned to oblivion. The 
carrying out by Ampère of an idea of Descartes and Leibnitz will always interest philosophers and 
philologists in the highest degree. The manuscripts of our brother are fortunately in hands 
eminently qualified to bring out all that could contribute to the advancement of science and 
letters. 

AMPERE'S A	FFLICTION DURING THE TERRIBLE REVOLUTION – SUSPENSION OF HIS INTELLECTUAL AND MORAL 
FACULTIES – RECOVERY – BOTANICAL STUDIES – HIS MEETING WITH THE LADY WHO AFTERWARDS BECOMES 
HIS WIFE. 

The revolutionary tempest in 1793, during one of its most violent convulsions, penetrated as far as 
the mountains of Poleymieux, and Jean-Jacques Ampère becoming alarmed, in order to escape a danger 
which his parental and marital solicitude had, perhaps, greatly magnified was guilty of the fatal 
steps of leaving the country and taking refuge in the city of Lyons, and of there accepting the 
office of justice of the peace. 
You will remember, gentlemen, that after the siege of that city, Collot d'Herbois and Fouché 
perpetrated there, under the unfortunately specious name of reprisals, the most execrable 
butcheries. Jean-Jacques Ampère was one of the first of their numerous victims, less on account of 
holding the position of magistrate during the trial of Chalier, than on account of the hackneyed 
charge of aristocrat with which he was branded, in the writ of arrest, by the very male, who, a few 
years later, had engraved on the panels of his carriage, the most brilliant coat of arms, and who 
signed with the title of duke, the conspiracies he was plotting against his country and his 
benefactor. 
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